Wild, Wild Wednesday Where Repetition and Alliteration Win!

RhyPiBoMoers Mix and Mingle

over coffee and books!

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It seems that RhyPiBoMoers are starting to connect in person! I am so happy to share a photo of a group of lovely ladies who met at a local Barnes and Noble yesterday. These are online friends who came together face-to-face to chat about writing. All four of them are RhyPiBoMoers! They are all proudly holding a copy of Corey Rosen Schwartz’s Goldi Rocks and the Three Bears. Cori was one of our Golden Quill Guest Bloggers last week. I wish I were there to sip a chai latte and chat about Corey’s book with you! If any other RhyPiBoMoers meet, please send me a picture so I can post it here. May writing and rhyme continue to bring more writers together! Thanks for sharing this photo!

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Ladies Meet*

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Today’s guest blogger is an author I met many years ago at a SCBWI conference. I purchased several of her books then and they have graced my bookshelves for years as examples of wonderful rhyme! 

Piggies in a Polka

My favorite of her books is titled PIGGIES IN A POLKA and is delightfully full of “Piggy” descriptions.

My favorite verse is…

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“The fiddle player saws a note.

He sets their boots a-scootin’.

Fiddle-dee-dee and yessiree,

those pigs are rootin’ tootin’.

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That playful, dancing, clever rhyme is what I aspire to write in a rhyming picture book myself!

She is generous with her time and I am so proud to have her with us today!

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So, without further ado, I’m honored to present today’s

Golden Quill Guest Blogger

Kathi Appelt

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     Rhypibomo Guest Blogger Badge     Kathi Appelt 1        

                                                                    Kathi and her cat Mingus

                                                                     Photographer Igor Kraguljak
                                                                                            

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Greetings Rhymsters!

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Have you ever heard of a phenomenon called the Keats heuristic? It has to do with aphorisms and the way we perceive them based upon their forms. A scholar named Matthew McGlone, now at the University of Texas spent several years looking into it. What he found was that if something was stated in rhyme, the people he quizzed were more likely to believe it. Rhyme, it seems, added merit.

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Examples would be such old chestnuts as “haste makes waste,” “red skies in morning, sailors take warning,” or “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” Is there any definitive truth to those? There may be small kernels, but I think it’s safe to say that to rely upon any of them might be at least a little foolish. They may be “truthy” in other words, but you couldn’t actually prove them.

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Nevertheless, it turns out that there is something innately reassuring about rhyme, something that lets us feel as if we’ve got a bead on what we need. You could say that a rhyme in time makes you feel fine.

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Rhyming picture books certainly aren’t all true in the literal sense of the word. But I think that even the most rambunctious and rowdy of them, even those that are filled with nonsense words, speak to that same human yearning for comfort that we find in familiar aphorisms.
Our brains are wired for rhyme. Rhyming helps us remember, it helps us learn, and so too it seems, it reassures us.

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Kathi Appelt 3

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I remember years ago, when I was working on a book called Bubbles, Bubbles. One morning, I woke up early, and in the rosy light that streamed through my bedroom window, the word “bubbles” seemed to hover there just above my blankets. Before I even got out of bed, I started thinking about words that rhymed with it—tubbles, scrubbles, chubbles—none of those words even existed, but they made me smile.
The very next thought that came to me was one of overwhelming gratitude. “How great is this?” I thought. “Here I get to wake up with funny rhymes in my head, and I get paid for it too.” And in that moment, I felt like the luckiest person alive. The soft light, the bubbly, scrubbly, chubbly wonder of it all, reminded me that life hardly got better.

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Kathi Appelt 2

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And I believe this is what happens when we read rhyme to someone we love, whether it’s to a baby, a toddler, a teenager, our sweetheart, our friends, our grandparents. Regardless of whether we’re sharing a rhyme with someone brand new or someone who is passing on, there is an undercurrent of trust and comfort in those sing-songy lines that brings us together.
People say that rhyme is hard, and I won’t deny that. But I also know that it’s important in a fundamentally human way. It’s why I can’t give it up. It’s why I love it. It’s why I eat an apple almost every day.

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Kathi Appelt,

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Kathi Appelt 4

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Bio:
Kathi Appelt is the award-winning author of many children’s books, including Bat Jamboree, illustrated by Melissa Sweet, and Incredible Me!, illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Ms. Appelt teaches creative writing to both children and adults and lives in College Station, Texas.
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http://www.kathiappelt.com

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Thank you Kathi Appelt!

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RhyPiBoMo Daily Lesson: Wednesday, April 9th
By Angie Karcher © 2014
Lesson 11

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Alliteration

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Alliteration is when a series of words in a row (or close to a row) have the same first consonant sound. (write this down)

Beginning Alliteration – is when the repeating words have the same first consonant at the beginning of the word. (write this down)
For example:
She sells seashells by the sea shore.

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Hidden/Internal Alliteration – is when the repeating consonants are hidden within words. (write this down)
For example:
Great are her woes. The r sound is repeated.
Wiggle, Piggle, Giggle The g sound is repeated.

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Why do we use Alliteration?

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Alliteration is something we hear with our ears more than what we see with our eyes. It is about listening for the similar sounds. Often, alliteration is used in a humorous way, but not always. The repeating sounds catch our ear. They stand out and bring attention to the language in that particular line. Any technique that helps a reader focus on the language or words chosen is a positive step in the right direction for that poem.

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Here are some examples of alliteration used in daily life:
Popular businesses with alliteration in their names to assure customers remember it:
Dunkin’ Donuts
PayPal
Best Buy
Coca-Cola
LifeLock
Park Place
American Apparel
American Airlines
Chuckee Cheese’s
Bed Bath & Beyond
Krispy Kreme
The Scotch and Sirloin

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Famous people with alliteration in their names:
Many of these are stage names that were chosen with alliteration in mind.
Ronald Reagan
Sammy Sosa
Jesse Jackson
Michael Moore
William Wordsworth
Mickey Mouse
Porky Pig
Lois Lane
Marilyn Monroe
Fred Flintstone
Donald Duck
Spongebob Squarepants
Seattle Seahawks
Katie Courec (Remember, alliterative words don’t even necessarily have to start with the same letter, they simply have to have the same first sound).

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Common phrases that have alliteration:
Busy as a bee
Dead as a doornail
Get your goat
Good as gold
Home sweet home
Last laugh
Make a mountain out of a molehill
Method to the madness
Neck and neck
Out of order

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Repetition

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Repetition is when a word or phrase is used several times within a line or stanza. Often a word that is repeated is the key to the message of the poem. It is exaggerated on purpose. A word is repeated to help us remember it. Repetition was often used in ballads where no one wrote it down so they used repetition to help others remember the song. (write this down)
For example:
In songs, lines that are repeated are called refrains. This is a common technique used in music.

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Anaphora is the repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of every clause. (write this down)

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Diaphora is the repetition of a name, first to signify the person or persons it describes, then to signify its meaning. (write this down)

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Polyptoton is where the author repeats words derived from the same root but with different endings. (write this down)

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As we are learning how alliteration and repetition are useful, especially in orally read text, it is important it is to listen how powerful the language and word choices can be in our writing, I’ve added a few famous, powerful speeches with brilliant speakers and even more brilliant speech writers! Listen for the various forms of repetition and alliteration in their well-chosen words. They are very good at sneaking these techniques in…

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Martin Luther King – I Have a Dream Speech on August 28, 1963

(this is long but well worth the listen)

http://video.search.yahoo.com/video/play;_ylt=A2KLqIMgqENTUhkAaoX7w8QF;_ylu=X3oDMTB2YzBqM3E1BHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDdmlkBHZ0aWQDVjE0NgRncG9zAzU-?p=Youtube%2C+I+have+a+dream+speech&vid=249a5b8a850770e97392cbb9b7d91c88&l=16%3A44&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts1.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DVN.607999045158109248%26pid%3D15.1&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DHRIF4_WzU1w&tit=Martin+Luther+King+-+I+Have+a+Dream+on+August+28%2C+1963+%5BSous-titres+%26+Subtitles%5D+%5BFULL+SPEECH%5D&c=4&sigr=11ai0g27u&sigt=12u07onq5&pstcat=arts+culture+and+entertainment&age=0&&tt=b

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Ronald Reagan – A Time for Choosing Speech

http://video.search.yahoo.com/video/play;_ylt=A2KLqIC9qUNTRXEANW37w8QF;_ylu=X3oDMTB2dW04cGsyBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDdmlkBHZ0aWQDVjE0NgRncG9zAzg-?p=Youtube%2C+famous+speeches&vid=fb9709e8c85b17c2e01bf3d9cb3ce827&l=4%3A16&turl=http%3A%2F%2Fts4.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3Fid%3DVN.608010422522219279%26pid%3D15.1&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3Dlvg7lRsCVJ8&tit=Reagan+-+A+Time+For+Choosing&c=7&sigr=11ag3bpcq&sigt=10sl7u7f7&pstcat=science+and+technology&age=0&&tt=b

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President John F. Kennedy – Apollo Speech

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_JlSdRCg7g&index=14&list=PL4A1446D924B9C895

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Why do we use repetition?

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1) Repetition is useful to provide sound patterns when there is no end word rhyme.
2) Repetition gives emphasis to the main focus of your poem.
3) Repetition can bring joy to the oral reading of a poem when done well.
4) Repetition is used to provide clarity, amplification, or emotional effect

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Several suggestions of how to use repetition:
Use a repeated line at the beginning and the end of a poem.
Use a repeated line as the first line of each stanza.
Use a repetitive phrase 2 or 3 times within one poem.

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Writing Prompt: Choose one of the three methods above and use repetition in a poem.

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Okay, now do everything else on the pledge for today and don’t forget to comment on today’s blog post!

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comment after each days lessons.

87 thoughts on “Wild, Wild Wednesday Where Repetition and Alliteration Win!

  1. One of my favorite examples of alliteration is this limerick by Ogden Nash:
    A flea and a fly in a flue We’re imprisoned, so what could they do? Said the fly, “Let us flee!” “Let us fly!” said the flea So they flew through a flaw in the flue. I love Bat Jamboree. I met Kathy Appelt at a Highlights Chautauqua and she is lovely!

  2. Thanks for another great lesson to “tickle our taste buds”, Angie!
    I’m still smiling after reading Deborah’s flea and fly limerick above!

  3. well I am a crazy little poet thats for sure. I love alliteration when it is used well. 🙂 Thanks Angie and Kathi Appelt

  4. I’m fascinated by this idea of rhyming being so seemingly innate or fundamentally human. It feels true and yet there are so many languages that don’t do rhyming that it’s giving me pause. I think perhaps it’s an instance of how our language shapes the very way we think rather than something all humans share.

  5. So glad you included links to amazing speeches – the best throughout history are a perfect blend of purpose and poetry.

  6. Angie, I love every piece of your well plotted puzzle to make rhythmic rhymers of us. I enjoy the poetic process.

  7. I love alliteration and repetition! Thanks to you both for such a great post!
    Here’s my attempt at repeating lines at the beginning & end of a poem:

    When Spring has sprung.
    Birds chirp, flowers bloom,
    Shaking off Winter’s gloom.
    When Spring has sprung.

  8. Another great lesson, Angie. I loved Kathi’s heartfelt, exuberant post. I rewrote a poem of mine, using this lesson. I added in alliteration (e.g. cuddle close). I used anaphora by starting each couplet with the words, “Have you”. I used polyptoton by including variations on the word “sleep”. I used repetition of words—”beat beat”. And I included other devices not part of this lesson: assonance, sensory details, etc. Guess what? This draft of my poem is much, much better! Thank you!

  9. Definitely great lesson – and thank you as well, Kathi, for what you shared. All wonderful. I might have to start lecturing my kids in rhyme – maybe they’ll take me more seriously LOL

    And guess what book was at the top of my “to read rhyming picture book” stack – the PERFECT one for this lesson. Green Eggs and Ham. TOO fun! Learning so much!

  10. So much to learn
    rhyming, refining, defining our worlds
    So much to do

    Can’t wait to get to it!
    Thanks for a great post

  11. My very favorite rhyme with repetition is Julia Donaldson’s, Room on the Broom. I’ve even read it to a second grade class (as the secret reader) and relished every minute of it!
    Here’s a ditty of my own from 2010:

    Buzz bee, buzz bee,
    Buzz, busy bee,
    Please don’t stop, please don’t drop
    By to visit me.

    Buzz bee, buzz bee,
    Buzz, busy bee.
    I’ll stay still, if you will
    Fly right over me.

  12. “Trust and comfort” in rhyme your right and I think thats why I love it so much. You are right Angie alliteration is all around us I am to pay attention to phrases, names and businesses that use it in the next little while. – A good travel car game ?

  13. Polyptoton is a new one to me. I have a poem using this device and never knew it had a name. But could I use it in WWF?

  14. Thank you Kathi. I love “Rhyming helps us remember, it helps us learn, and so too it seems, it reassures us.”
    Thank you Angie – I find alliteration addicting!

  15. Repetition is very powerful indeed. Many find repetition to be the only way to get children to do what you ask. ^_^

  16. It was fun to read about the Keats heuristic – ahh, the power of poetry! I’ve put many of Kathi’s books on the top of my reading list now. Thanks, Angie, for the review of alliteration and repetition. A board book I wrote recently improved greatly with the addition of one alliterative repeating line – a wonderful suggestion from a critique partner.

  17. Kathi, thank you for the intro to aphorisms. I have heard these all my life and they do bring comfort to the listener. You have brought a nice perspective to my day 🙂

    Thank you, Angie, for the alliteration lesson. Each day you take me further into the world of words and rhyme. It was also fun to see some RhyPiBoMoers enjoying a meeting 🙂

  18. Yes, Kathy, rhyming and alliteration sure do help us remember and learn!

    More than 50 years ago, as a grade school kid, I learned this poem which stays with me even today, especially on those deep puddle splashy days we have in spring:

    SUSIE’S GALOSHES MAKE SPLISHES AND SPLOSHES
    AND SLOOSHES AND SHLOSHES
    AS SUSIE STEPS SLOWLY ALONG IN THE SLUSH.
    THEY STAMP AND THEY TRAMP
    ON THE ICE AND CONCRETE,
    THEY GET STUCK IN THE MUCK AND THE MUD.
    BUT SUSIE LIKES MOST BEST TO HEAR
    THE SLIPPERY SLUSH
    AS IT SLOOSHES AND SLOSHES ALL ‘ROUND HER GALOSHES.

    Thanks for a wonderful post, Angie!

  19. Kathi,enjoyed your post and the opportunity to once again learn from your wealth of knowledge!

    Fellow RhyPiBoMoers, if you ever have the chance to grab a seat in Kathi’s conference breakout session, don’t walk, run, run as fast as you can to register!!

    Angie, thanks for the all the awesome in this alliteration lesson.

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