Read it Out Loud Until it Sings! Friday

Read it Out Loud Until it Sings! Friday    Day Day 27

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Don’t forget…

The Golden Quill Poetry Contest submissions are due tomorrow!

 I think I have sent email confirmations to all the competitors but if you are unsure if I got it, please send me an email at Angiekarcherrpbm@gmail.com

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We will celebrate Willy S’s Birthday

on Saturday with one last Rhyming Party!

Brush up on your William Shakespeare facts,

as well as information from the past weeks lessons!

RhyPiBoMo Rhyming Party

 

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I was mistaken in my post yesterday about Lori Degman’s book Cock-a-Doodle Oops…I said that it came out this month. It actually comes out in May so please go to Amazon and pre-order your copy now!

Cock-a-Doodle-Oops!

 

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Also, please remember that the webinar that was originally scheduled for tonight has been rescheduled for May 12th at 6:00 Pacific Standard Time. Here is the link to reserve your spot….

 https://wj168.infusionsoft.com/app/page/free_poetry_webinar

 

Today’s guest blogger is the very talented author of many rhyming picture books. She actually had a book come out this month! I got the two authors and their books confused…It took me 27 authors guest blogging to get two of them mixed up! LOL

Her book Puddle Pug came out April 1st!

 

9781454904366_cvr.inddPuddle Pug

 

It is on my list of books to buy, that is growing by the day. Here is the

wonderful description….

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“Percy the Pug loves puddles—big puddles, small puddles, swamp puddles, stomp puddles. But no puddle is perfect  . . .  until he finds one with three friendly piglets. But protective Mama Pig says NO PUGS and chases Percy away! Irresistibly illustrated by Keika Yamaguchi, Kim Norman’s tale about a persistent pug and his pursuit of friendship in puddle paradise brims with warmth and charm.”

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Check it out and order or grab a copy today!

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So, without further ado, I’m honored to present today’s

Golden Quill Guest Blogger

Kim Norman!

   Rhypibomo Guest Blogger Badge     Kim Norman 1

 

In the 90s, as I began my journey as a children’s writer, everywhere I turned I encountered this advice: “Editors hate rhyme. They won’t buy rhyme. Don’t write your book in rhyme.”

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I followed that advice, and the first picture book I sold was non-rhyming. So far, it’s my least successful book. I’m sure there were other factors than mere lack of rhyme that led to poor sales, including the fact that it had a cryptic title and no one had ever heard of me.

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But the facts remain:
• I’m good at writing rhyme.
• Editors do buy rhyming manuscripts. Sometimes they’ll even fight for them in an auction! (My first auction between three publishers was for a rhyming text.)
• Kids love rhyme.
• Rhyming books can sell very well. My Ten on the Sled has gone into multiple re-printings, has been issued in a wide variety of formats and has been translated into Korean and German… which also refutes the argument that rhyming texts are too hard to translate. I can’t speak for the Korean edition, but I remember my C+ high school German well enough to know that the translator managed to make it rhyme for die kleinen Kinder.

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That old “Editors-hate-rhyme” chestnut is missing a word. Editors don’t hate rhyme. They hate BAD rhyme. If it’s clever, fresh and well-written, they love it. They were once rhyme-loving kids themselves.

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Here are a few things you can do to ensure your rhyming manuscript is fresh enough to catch an editor’s eye (and ear!)

• Look for surprising rhymes. It’s hard to surprise a reader when pairing words like “glad” and “sad.” In fact, single syllable rhymes are probably the hardest to keep fresh, because “glad” is so tediously likely to be followed by “sad.” I try to shake things up and phrase my sentences so the rhymes are unexpected. This doesn’t mean pulling out a thesaurus and trying to find a 5-syllable rhyme. It means rewriting and rewriting until I’ve crafted phrases and rhymes my reader hasn’t seen a hundred times before.

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• Avoid what I call “gratuitous rhymes.” These are rhymes using awkward phrasing or poorly-chosen words just to make the rhyme. Sorry, but Dr. Seuss got away with this a lot. I adored him, too, but there was mighty awkward phrasing in some of his books, not to mention characters whose names seemed to conveniently rhyme with words important to the themes of the books. You and I will not be allowed that leeway. So if you’re tempted to write “fast he went” simply because the previous line ends with the word “bent”… you are allowed this luxury… ON YOUR FIRST DRAFT. Modern American language is not structured this way. Your rhymes need to flow as naturally as modern speech. If this means rewriting it two dozen times, so be it. (Ironic I used an archaic phrase like “so be it” to emphasize this point, don’t you think?)

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• Write text that would be fun to read even if it weren’t in rhyme. Include other forms of wordplay, like alliteration, assonance, repetition, opposites, humor, etc.

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• After several rewrites, print up two copies. Give one copy to a friend and ask her to read it aloud to you – cold (no advance practice) – while you read along silently from your own copy, marking any spot where she stumbles over words or meter. Do this with several friends, especially those you know are good with rhythm and meter – perhaps folks who are musically inclined. Then go back and FIX those spots, so that – next time around – your cold reader achieves a flawless first read. It doesn’t matter if you love one particular stanza more than your firstborn child. If it causes a reader to stumble, you MUST change it.

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I don’t always write in rhyme. In fact, the first of this month, Puddle Pug was released – a mostly non-rhyming book published by Sterling Children’s Books. (It does have a few rhyming couplets, but the story is told in prose.) But, cute-as-a-bug pugs aside, here’s what I have decided about my writing career: I like writing in rhyme. It’s the only type of writing that pulls me back to my desk, instead of avoiding it like homework. To me, writing in rhyme feels more like play than work. And that’s a darned nice way to make a living.

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Bio:
Kim Norman has ten picture books in print (six in rhyme) with another three in production. Her books have been published by Sterling Children’s Books, Scholastic and two Penguin imprints. Several of her books have been featured in Scholastic Book Fairs and Club fliers. I KNOW A WEE PIGGY, illustrated by Henry Cole, (Dial Books for Young Readers) received numerous starred reviews, was favorably reviewed in the New York Times and was added to the 2013 “Texas 2×2” reading list. Kim lives in Virginia but travels around the U.S. doing author visits to elementary schools, where she shares her love of reading and writing. She is represented by the Andrea Brown Literary Agency. http://www.kimnormanbooks.com

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I want to introduce you to Kim’s latest book baby…Puddle Pug!

9781454904366_cvr.indd

 Released April 1, 2014 Congrats Kim!
http://www.kimnormanbooks.com/

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More of Kim’s wonderful books!

JACK OF ALL TAILS, Dutton, 2007
CROCODADDY, Sterling, 2009
TEN ON THE SLED, Sterling, 2010
ALL KINDS OF KITTENS, Sterling, 2010
STORYTIME STICKERS: WHALES, Sterling, 2011
I KNOW A WEE PIGGY WHO WALLOWED IN BROWN, Dial, 2012
STORYTIME STICKERS: DINOSAURS, Sterling, forthcoming
UNDERCOVER CLAUS, Sterling, forthcoming

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Thank you Kim Norman!

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RhyPiBoMo Daily Lesson: Friday, April 25th
By Angie Karcher © 2014
Lesson 27

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Read it Out Loud!

Have a Friend Read it Out Loud!

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Why read it out loud?
When text is read out loud it takes on a new personality…it becomes an interactive, oral, dramatic piece of work.
When you read a story out loud you take on a new personality too. You take off your writer hat and put on your snazzy, sequined, story teller hat. Your voice takes on character’s voices, your intonation rises and falls, you speed up and you slow down depending on the events occurring. You even pause in the perfect spots to set up a dramatic moment. That is if you are reading a well written picture book manuscript!

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Reasons Why:
test word choices
test pacing
hear intonation when reading aloud
To catch typos, grammatical errors and omitted words
Listen for the pauses
To test the order of the story – does it make sense?
To test the plot – is it effective?
To test the sentence structure – are they too repetitive, too convoluted or too long?
Does the rhythm flow?
Reading it out loud is multi-sensory – you will now hear your text as well as having already seen it. This allows for more absorption as we all learn more from different sensory techniques.

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Checklist
It is very important to only look for one type of flaw at a time! Start with one and then read it again to look for the next
□ Spelling – don’t trust spell check!
□ Grammar
□ Sentence Structure
□ Omitted Words
□ Word Choice
□ Pacing
□ Plot
□ Meter
□ Pauses
□ Poetic Devices

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This is a starter list so you can add to it!

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Here are several wonderful resources explaining why to read your manuscripts out loud:

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How to Read Your Writing Out Loud
http://matadornetwork.com/notebook/how-to-read-your-writing-out-loud/

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The Writing Center
http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/reading-aloud/

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The Writing Center
http://writingcenter.tamu.edu/for-faculty/teaching-writing/instruction/reading-aloud/

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This site has an AWESOME list of editing tips from professional proofreaders and editors.
LR Communication Systems, Inc.

http://www.lrcom.com/tips/proofreading_editing.htm
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We have covered the why, so now here are a few options of how to do it…

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Read it to yourself

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The first and most obvious way is to sit down and read it out loud to yourself. My dogs are my best audience. They love everything I write! I know this because they dance around with tails wagging…I say, “Let’s read” They come running…LOL
Okay, maybe my dogs aren’t my best audience for feedback.

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Read it to yourself one sentence at a time – starting at the end of the story and moving backwards to the beginning.

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This forces you to only focus on that sentence. You won’t be thinking about anything but the sentence structure, word choices, punctuation, rhythm, meter and omitted words. It is about the sentence. If you try to do this in the natural order of the sentences, you tend to start thinking about other story details and not just focusing on the sentence.

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Have someone else read it to you

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It is actually better to have someone else read it to you. When we as writers read it, we automatically add the pauses, intonation, and adjust the pacing for the story because we know how we want it to read. That is different than the actual way it reads.
Find someone who will read it to you while you sit with a copy of the text in front of you. Mark all the spots where they trip on words, stumble on phrases and literally fall down when it comes to the pacing.

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Ask lots and lots of people; adults, teachers, kids, neighbors, friends, relatives, other writers, critique group members, ets…

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Record yourself while reading the text out loud

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Most telephones and digital devices have a recording option. This is a quick option and also nice because you could listen to it over and over as needed for editing purposes. You can also re-record it as you go through the process.

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Did you know that Word can talk?

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Janet Smart, a RhyPiBoMoer mentioned in our Facebook Group that Microsoft Word has a speech command. It is very simple to set up and very useful. I had never heard this before so I followed her quick instructions and immediately, my stories were being read back to me on the spot. Thanks so much Janet!

JanetSmart’s blog The Blackberry Patch where she gives detailed instructions on how to find and enable this feature.

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http://creativewritingintheblackberrypatch.blogspot.com/2013/07/learning-every-day-speak-command-on-word.html

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Another Voice Command Option

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I found another voice command option that is free for 10 minutes a day and easy to use. You do have to down load it but I tested it and it was quick, safe and works well, with some interesting additional options. It is called Natural Reader and it allows you to alter the reader’s language, voice, speed of reading and more. You are also able to share your work on social media if you choose and you can send it via email and save it as an audio file. One other interesting feature is that it offers an mp3 version so you could listen to it on your phone or other electronic devices while driving or traveling, etc. There is a fee for this option and I didn’t see how much. It’s really pretty cool.

Natural Reader is another option

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http://www.naturalreaders.com/index.php

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This is a poem that I downloaded just for you to hear the difference between the Word reader and this one.

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It’s a poem called Word Outgoing that I wrote years ago. Interestingly enough, when the Natural Reader read it to me directly from their site, he read it much smoother and without the odd pronunciation moments. Once I downloaded it to share here, my reader guy seemed to have twitches in his reading, pronounced don’t as “daaahn-tee” and p.j.s as “P J S” Too funny! There are some oddities as with any digital format but for practicality, this works.

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http://www.naturalreaders.com/onlinetts.php?bookid=092b6288-cc4c-11e3-861e-12313d27c687&bookname=NaturalReaders&page=1&addr=http://api.naturalreaders.com/v2/storage/text/092b6288-cc4c-11e3-861e-12313d27c687.txt

(I had trouble hearing this with my iPad but it worked on my laptop…??)

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I found a digital app for making dummies! And it reads it back to you!

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Yesterday we were talking about picture book dummies and someone commented that they wondered if there is an app to create a book dummy. I found an app called the Little Story Creator that will work.

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It is really for kids to create and share digital stories but it would totally work for the purpose of creating a picture book dummy. It is simple to create a cover, decorative end pages, apply text to each page etc. You can easily go back and delete or edit if needed.

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It also has a read aloud feature. After you are all done, it will read it back to you page by page. The digital book dummy can then be shared through email or social media if you need to send it to someone else for an opinion.
I’m still searching, but this is the first one I found that was simple and free…

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Little Story Creator
https://itunes.apple.com/app/id721782955

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Here is a silly little story that I started while testing the process…I’m ashamed to say it doesn’t rhyme but I started playing and then decided to use it as an example…

I call this Fred and Laurenneʹ Make Onionneʹ Souppeʹ

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Fred and Laurenne

http://www.littlestorycreator.com/view/s-55BDEB37-D458-4958-86DC-9EB91AE4DC96

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You click the arrows to move front to back and you can either click the arrow for the read aloud feature or you can click the actual page.

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My hope is that they will make delicious French onion soup together some day!
It’s a work in progress…LOL

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There are lots more options that I haven’t explored but basically I created a digital picture book dummy in less than 15 minutes, that is recorded in my voice, and I can now listen to over and over until all the editing is done. Simple and effective!

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Reading Prompt: Use one or more of the read aloud prompts above for your picture book manuscript that you have been working on this month.

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Okay, now do everything else on the pledge for today and don’t forget to comment on today’s blog post!

RhyPiBoMo Pledge

RhyPiBoMo PledgeRhyPiBoMo Pledge Please comment ONLY ONE TIME below for a chance to win today’s prize! Prizes will be drawn by Random.com next Sunday for the previous week. To be eligible for a prize you must be a registered participant and comment after each days lessons.

 

Un-der-stand-ing Syl-la-bles Sat-ur-day

I must alert you…there is a Poetry Notebook

Thief on the loose!

One of our RhyPiBoMo Notebooks has been stolen!

RhyPiBoMo Notebook

Last week I mailed one of our coveted RhyPiBoMo Notebooks to Kristen Spina Foote, a Rhyming Party winner. She sadly informed me today that she received an empty package from the USPS! Empty! Apparently, a Rhyming-Poetry Thief stole the notebook! I knew I should have insured that notebook for more money! So, be warned, if you display anything with the words RhyPiBoMo on it, there is a chance it may be stolen, so…guard it with your life! LOL

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Kristen, watch for another one coming to you soon! I’ll put it in a box this time!

Package

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RhyPiBoMo Rhyming Party

Our Next Rhyming Party will be this Sunday at 6:00 p.m. Central Time!

(That’s Chicago Time)

What is a Rhyming party? It’s a one hour rhyming fun challenge in our Facebook Group! First, you must be a registered RhyPiBoMoer, next you must only comment in rhyme during the entire hour and finally, bring your fast fingers because I ask lots of quiz-type questions about the previous week’s blog posts and the fastest one to answer gets their name thrown into a hat for a prize.  As I hadn’t figured out how to fund the prizes for this year, they are very  limited. I will give away another RhyPiBoMo notebook and a manuscript critique by me, this Sunday…

So be there or be square!

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I was fortunate enough to meet today’s guest blogger at a Regional SCBWI Conference last spring in Ft. Wayne, Indiana. I listened her keynote address to hundreds of eager writers, in a beautiful ball room, surrounded by other well-known, yet equally as enthralled authors. The room stood still as Jane took the podium, sharing stories of her past, demanding the absolute best from each and every one of us sitting there and uttering her famous “Butt in Chair” phrase” as the crowd smiled and clapped. She’s a rock star! Yes, I asked her to autograph several of her books for me that day. I was impressed at how genuine and down to earth she was…and how smart! I was honored to meet her!

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So, without further ado, I’m honored to present today’s

Golden Quill Guest Blogger

Jane Yolen!

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       Rhypibomo Guest Blogger Badge    Jane Yolen 1

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Poems are coded messages of fact and emotion. Did you know that poems were actually used in World War II as the base for the SOE, Special Ops Executive codes that the Underground used in France and elsewhere. Agents’ ciphers hinged on poems, and one of the most famous was written by Leo Marks for his fiancée who died in a plane crash. When Marks was in SOE, he gave this poem to the beautiful French agent Violette Szabo to use as her cipher before she was dropped into occupied France in 1944

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The life that I have
Is all that I have
And the life that I have
Is yours.

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The love that I have
Of the life that I have
Is yours and yours and yours.

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A sleep I shall have
A rest I shall have
Yet death will be but a pause.

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For the peace of my years
In the long green grass
Will be yours and your and yours.

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Poets are code masters, and especially when we write poems for children. Our poems—whether funny or serious, short or long, nonsense or full of sense—change the course of a child’s growing as thoroughly as the Leonard Markses of World War II changed the course of history.

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But just as Marks’ poem is rhymed on the slant (yours and pause and years are not perfect rhymes but remind the reader that I have resonance, kissing cousins as it were.

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I sometimes worry that we children’s book poets forget that the family of poetry is very wide. Not just the immediate mother/father/sister/brother, those perfectly rhymed and scanned lines. Sometimes we need to break away from the jingle and go into the jungle of terrifying poetry.
Do you know J. Patrick Lewis’ poem that begins:

From Pat Lewis
The Rules of History
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The fatter the king, the thinner the serf.
The longer the reign, the duller the pain.
The stronger the crown, the weaker the law.
The fainter the dream, the slimmer the hope.
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And after two more wonderful, heart-pounding, forced-march verses ends this way:

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The weaker the foe, the shriller the cry.
The louder the lie, the further the truth.
The madder the war, the sadder the foes.
The wiser the peace, the wider the peace.

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Now there are no end rhymes in it, but some internal rhyming both true rhymes, like madder/sadder and slant rhyme reminders wiser/wider of what he is writing about.

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But if he’d written this in jingle form—and he’s very good at rhymed poems as well—he might have come up with something like this:

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The weaker the foe, the shriller the cry.
The further the truth, the louder the lie
The madder the war, the sadder the foes.
For that is the way the world often goes.

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But look what we have lost in this poem: the pounding footsteps of the advancing army, the last line bashing in your head with a homily. This way, the verse could be put on Burma Shave signs, those placards of one line after another of a jingle that was the invention of a shaving cream ad campaign. But the way Lewis writes it, it will be put in the child reader’s heart.

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I’m not saying do away with rhyme. I am saying make the rhyme fit what the poem is about. Be clever, be deep, be sensual with your word choices. Don’t let the rhyme dictate the poem but the poem dictate the word and line choices.

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Be coded message, not an ad campaign.

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–Jane Yolen, author of Emily Sonnets

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Emily Sonnets

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Word for PB Writers

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Jane Yolen 5

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Bio:
Jane Yolen, often called “the Hans Christian Andersen of America,” admits to actually being the Hans Jewish Andersen of America. She is the author of 350 books, ranging from picture books and baby board books, through middle grade fiction, poetry collections, nonfiction, novels, graphic novels, and story collections . Her books and stories have won many awards, including two Nebulas, a World Fantasy Award, a Caldecott, the Golden Kite, three Mythopoeic awards, two Christopher Medals, nomination for the National Book Award, and Jewish Book Award. She has two collections of adult poetry and a gadzillion books of children’s poetry. She also won the Kerlan Award and the Catholic Library’s Regina Medal. Six colleges and universities have given her honorary doctorates.

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Thank you Jane Yolen!

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RhyPiBoMo Daily Lesson: Saturday, April 12th
By Angie Karcher © 2014
Lesson 14

Consider this a bit of Saturday review…

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Perhaps we should start by asking how many syllables are in the word poem?
I pronounce it “Po-em” with 2 syllables but some people pronounce it “Poem” with one syllable. The official word based on 3 syllable dictionaries is that poem has 2 syllables. This brings us to such an important lesson about how critical it is to know your words. Choose them wisely and maybe even leave out words that could be controversial in the pronunciation.

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A Syllable – is a unit of organization for a sequence of speech sounds and is an uninterrupted segment of speech. A syllable is the smallest conceivable expression of sound.(write this down)

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For example:
Dog has 1 syllable
Kit-ten has 2 syllables
Syl-la-ble has 3 syllables
A-vi-a-tion has 4 syllables
Dis-a-gree-a-ble has 5 syllables

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A syllable is a unit of pronunciation uttered without interruption, loosely, a single sound. All words are made from at least one syllable. (write this down)

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Vowels – A-E-I-O-U and sometimes Y
Consonants – B-C-D-F- G- H- J- K- L- M- N- P- Q- R- S- T- V- X- Z -W-Y:
Note that the combination of consonants can create a singular sound as well
For example:
TH – SH- CH – GR – DR

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Monosyllables have only one vowel sound (write this down)

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Polysyllables have more than one. (write this down)

If a syllable ends with a consonant, it is called a closed syllable.
If a syllable ends with a vowel, it is called an open syllable.

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Thanks to Mandy Yates, a Reading Specialist, for a better explanation of the different types of syllables!

Here are the 6 different types of syllables:(write this down)

1) Closed– CVC or just VC (cat or if) a consonant closes the vowel sound making it a short vowel)

2) Open– CV or just V (there is no consonant closing it off so it’s a long vowel sound and there is just one vowel= to, go, no or just I or a.)

3) Vce- words with the silent e= like, bake, cake, note

4) R-Controlled or Vowel R– words with ar/ur/or/er/ir- these appear to be closed, but in order to be closed the vowel would be short. These make a whole new sound.

5) Vowel Teams or Vowel Pairs– two vowels side by side. Can create a long sound = ai/ea/ay sometimes a short sound like /ea/ in bread or a whole new sound= ou/ow/oi

6)  Final Stable Syllables– these are non-phonetic patterns (meaning you can’t sound them out) that go on the end of a word: tion/tian/cian/ etc…or all of the consonant le patterns (ble/tle/ple.)

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There is a tendency in English when a word with a
stressed final syllable is followed by another word without a pause,
the stress moves forward: “kangaROO”, but “KANGaroo court”;
“afterNOON”, but “AFTernoon nap”; “above BOARD”, but “an aBOVEboard
deal”.

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An interesting link to several maps showing regional difference in specific words:

http://www.thejournal.ie/maps-americans-pronounce-different-words-938575-Jun2013/

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Why must we have a concrete understanding of syllables?

The best way to improve your rhythm and meter is to get used to counting syllables. This is obviously not the only factor nor should it be your main focus, just the place to begin. This should become second nature to you.

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I was a dedicated syllable counter before researching the daily lessons here but now I have a whole bag of tricks to use when writing poetry…not just counting syllables! That said, it is still important that your lines stay consistent in syllable count. I think there is a tiny bit of wiggle room in rhyming picture books but not much…just an extra syllable here or there…This should be the very limited exception to the rule!

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Review:
The best poems to practice this with would be with Haiku, Tanka and Cinquain. We discussed Haiku and Cinquain the first week so this will be good practice.

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Haiku – 3 line poem
line one has five syllables
line two has seven syllables
line three has five syllables

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For example:
Sparrows circle high (5 syllables)
Sunny rays stream through gray skies (7 syllables)
Water drips from leaves (5 syllables)

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Tanka – 5 line poem
line one has five syllables
line two has seven syllables
line three has five syllables
line four has seven syllables
line five has seven syllables

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For example:
Snow drifts by my glass (5 syllables)
Spiders of ice form a branch (7 syllables)
Dancing on a breeze (5 syllables)
Small white dots move back and forth (7 syllables)
Sway to Mother Nature’s call (7 syllables)

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Cinquain – 5 line poem
line one has two syllables
line two has four syllables
line three has six syllables
line four has eight syllables
line five has two syllables

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For example:
Puppies (2 syllables)
Ornery fun (4 syllables)
Playing, barking, sleeping (6 syllables)
Favorite little loving friends (8 syllables)
Playful (2 syllables)

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Look what I found…a few syllable dictionaries! These could certainly help with those words that are pronounced differently in different regions.

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Syllable Dictionary
http://howmanysyllables.com/words/calculator
Syllable and Word Count Calculator
http://www.wordcalc.com/
Syllable Counter
http://www.poetrysoup.com/poetry_resources/syllable_counter.aspx

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Resource: REALLY GOOD INFORMATION!
Poetry Terms and Forms
http://www.famousliteraryworks.com/poetry-terms.htm

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As Jane Yolen is our guest blogger, I had to share something

I found on her website that will be very helpful.

Five Tips On Writing A Poem
By Jane Yolen

1. Look at the world through metaphor,
seeing one tree in terms of another.

2. Let two words bump up against another
Or seesaw on a single line.

3. Tell the truth inside out
Or on the slant.

4. Remember that grammar can be a good friend
And a mean neighbor.

5. Let the poem rhyme in the heart,
Though not always on the page.
http://janeyolen.com/poetry/

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Writing Prompt: Write a Tanka today, as this is not one we have tried yet.

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Okay, now do everything else on the pledge for today and don’t forget to comment on today’s blog post!

RhyPiBoMo Pledge

RhyPiBoMo PledgeRhyPiBoMo Pledge
Please comment ONLY ONE TIME below for a chance to win today’s prize!
Prizes will be drawn by Random.com next Sunday for the previous week.
To be eligible for a prize you must be a registered participant and
comment after each days lessons.

No Rest for the RhyPiBoMoers!

It’s Sunday, the day for our

Rhyming Party today at Noon, Central Time!

Go to the

RhyPiBoMo Facebook Group

to join the fun!

RhyPiBoMo Rhyming Party

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Announcing this weeks daily prize winners!

Don’t forget to comment EACH  day that you participate in order to be eligible for the week’s prizes. You have until Midnight on Saturday each week to get caught up for the week.  There were several people who would have won a prize that commented but are not registered for the event. You must be registered to qualify for a prize! Click the registration tab above or go to https://angiekarcher.wordpress.com/rhypibomo-registration/and register now!

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This week’s Daily Prize winners are:                              

Sunday              Kevan Atteberry Art quality signed print of his rhyme cartoon       Penny Parker Klostermann

Monday             Bear Feels Scared by Karma Wilson                                                            Charlotte Dixon

Tuesday            Who Goes There? by Karma Wilson                                                              Cecilia Clark

Wednesday       Choice of Noodle & Lou, Think Big or Happy Birthday

                            Bunny by Liz Garton Scanlon                                                                         Lori Mozdzierz

Thursday          Beetle Bop  by Denise Fleming                                                                        Helen Dening

Friday                2 Hour Manuscript Edit by Jackie Hosking                                               Jennifer B. Young

Saturday           underGROUND BY Denise Fleming                                                              Jill Proctor

 

WINNERS: EMAIL me at 

Angie.karcher@yahoo.com

with your mailing addresses to receive your prize!

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As our Daily Lesson is on stanzas today, I thought I’d share a Stanza Riddle!

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Who is tall, dark and handsome and puts up with a children’s author who…

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Writes all night and sleeps all day,

forgets to make dinner but write this buffet?

He doesn’t complain or ever ask why,

my husband Stan-za really great guy!

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Mardi Gras 2013

Mardi Gras 2013

Thank you Stan Karcher for putting up with my shenanigans! I love you!

Happy Birthday on April 23rd! I’m telling you early in case I forget in all my RhyPiBoMo mania! = )

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Fortunately, you can’t see how messy my office has become in one short week, strewn with picture books, rhyming dictionaries, and empty coffee mugs, but look what came in the mail Yesterday! I finally got my copy of GOOD BYE, BAD BYE. It is a delight! This newly released rhyming picture book is a gem, combining Deborah’s thrifty yet brilliant text and Jonathan Bean’s amazing illustrations.

photo (1)

“Bad truck, bad guy; bad wave, bad bye . . .” A boy and his family are packing up their old home, and the morning feels scary and sad. But when he arrives at his new home, an evening of good byes awaits: bye to new friends, bye to glowing fireflies, bye to climbing trees. Happy Book Birthday month to BAD BYE, GOOD BYE!

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So, without further ado, I’m honored to present today’s

Golden Quill Guest Blogger

Deborah Underwood

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        Rhypibomo Guest Blogger Badge         Deborah Underwood 1

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How’s Your Verse Sense?

You may know people whose poetic efforts are impeccable. Their rhymes are natural, not forced; they don’t use convoluted syntax (like “the box unopened underneath her bed she put”); their words skip along, effortlessly conforming to the metrical structure they’ve set up.

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You may also know otherwise-excellent writers who repeatedly bring subpar rhyming manuscripts to critique meetings. The rhymes are forced. Some lines are missing a foot (or two or three). The metrical pattern changes randomly from stanza to stanza.

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What do the former folks have that the latter folks lack? I call it verse sense: the ability to tell good verse from bad.

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Like any writing skill or asset, verse sense comes naturally to some. I feel fortunate in that it’s pretty easy for me to hear when rhyme doesn’t work. Writing descriptive passages, though? I am terrible at that. Terrible!

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Does this mean that if I yearn to write a description-filled novel, I shouldn’t try it? Of course not. But I’ll have an extra hurdle, because my natural description ability is nonexistent. I’ll need to work my tail off to compensate.

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You can probably see where I’m going with this.

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You’ve heard a million times how biased editors are against rhyming manuscripts. That’s because they’ve seen so many bad ones. And does any writer think she’s submitting a bad rhyming manuscript? Of course not!

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Thus, the bad manuscripts are submitted by people who 1) don’t have natural verse sense and 2) don’t know that they lack it.

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That last bit is important. Because if you know you don’t have verse sense, you can acquire it through study and practice. You can:

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– Learn about poetic forms in more detail. (Participating in RhyPiBoMo is a great place to start!)
– Analyze your rhyme beat by beat, marking stressed and unstressed syllables and counting feet in each line.
– Rely on writing friends who do have an ear for rhyme.
– Comb through your work to eliminate syntactical contortions.
– Read all the fabulous rhyming picture books you can get your hands on. (Read some bad ones too and figure out why they don’t work!)
– Surround yourself with good rhyme of all kinds. One of my favorite non-kidlit sources: the works of Gilbert & Sullivan. I was a huge fan of The Mikado when I was in grade school, and I attribute some of my rhyme affinity to my early fascination with and delight in that operetta’s clever libretto.

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Basically, you must do whatever you need to do to make your rhyming manuscripts very, very good. Because that is what they need to be–for your own sake, so you can get them published, and for the sake of the kids who will read them.

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So where are you on the verse sense spectrum? Are you certain you’re rhyme-savvy, because many friends you trust have told you that? Are you so-so? Do you suspect that you don’t have a natural affinity for rhyme?

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An honest assessment, with the help of trusted critique pals, will help you plan your next steps. Then onward to rhyming glory!

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Two of Deborah’s Latest books:

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Deborah Underwood 2

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   Deborah Underwood 3

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Deborah is the author of the following children’s books:
The Loud Book (Houghton Mifflin, 2011)
The Quiet Book (Houghton Mifflin, 2010)
A Balloon for Isabel (Greenwillow Books, 2010)
Granny Gomez & Jigsaw (Disney*Hyperion, 2010)
Pirate Mom (Random House, 2006)

She writes the Sugar Plum Ballerina chapter book series with Whoopi Goldberg.

She’ s written numerous nonfiction books for educational publishers. Her poems, articles, and stories have been published in National Geographic Kids, Spider, Ladybug, Pockets, and other children’s magazines. She has also been hired by educational publishers to write leveled science books, phonics readers, testing passages, and test questions.

Thank You Deborah Underwood!

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RhyPiBoMo Daily Lesson: Sunday, April 6th
By Angie Karcher © 2014
Lesson 8

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Stanza

A Stanza is a rhyming pattern in poetry that forms a group. (write this down)
A stanza can have any number of lines. These groups of lines are given specific names.
Usually there is a blank line between stanzas to separate them.
The different verses in music are stanzas.

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I listed these yesterday but we will go into more detail now…

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Special names of stanzas depending on the number of lines:

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2 lines – Couplet
3 lines – Tercet
4 lines – Quatrain
5 lines – Quintet
6 lines – Sestet
7 lines – Septet
8 lines – Octave
9 lines – Nine-line stanza
10 line – Ten-line stanza etc…

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Couplets, tercets and quatrains are the foundation of poetry! (write this down)

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Couplet – A 2 line stanza with end words that rhyme.
For example:
I want to climb the tree so high
And reach to touch the cloudy sky

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Tercet – A 3 line stanza with end words that rhyme.
For example:
When walking down the gravel road
I spied a slimy, greenish toad.
He jumped into in his wet abode.

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Quatrain – A 4 line stanza with a variety of rhyme schemes.
The most common rhyme scheme for a quatrain is where lines 2 and 4 rhyme.

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For example:
I see while sitting in the grass
and counting sheep by twos.
Two, four, six, yes eight of them
are really full-grown ewes.

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How could I get through this post without mentioning

Jill Esbaum’s adorable rhyming picture book titled

STANZA…

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Stanza*

Stanza is a closet poet who secretly enters a poetry contest. He’s hoping to win first prize, fame, fortune and Lotsa snapper treats.

*My favorite two lines are “he’s itching to write” and “he’s doggone depressed”
It’s such a delight and the meter is Stantastic!

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Here are other variations of quatrain rhyme scheme.
For example:
ABAB
I ate the chip.
It made me want
to do a flip;
a silly stunt!

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For example:
AABB uses two couplets
The apple is a yummy snack
to eat while sitting on a yack.
Remember, though, to share a bite
This will prevent a yack-snack fight.

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For example:
AAAB
My brother is always annoying and loud.
My mother believes that his head’s in a cloud.
He really embarrasses me in a crowd.
I wish he would just go to sleep.For example:

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AABA
A pickle is crunchy when you take a bite.
The noise is so loud, I think that it might
cause mountains to topple and elm trees to fall.
This is a good reason for pickle-bite fright!

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ABBA this is called an envelope verse, the middle rhyme is enveloped by the outer rhymes.
Word on the street is it’s going to rain.
I’m a sad fella,
sans my umbrella.
I am preparing to get wet again!

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Longer stanzas are made up of various combinations of the couplet, tercet and quatrain.

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There are obviously many combinations that can be used in different stanzas. One I came across is called a Spenserian stanza. It was invented by Edmund Spenser. Each stanza contains nine lines in total: eight lines in iambic pentameter followed by a single ‘alexandrine’ line in iambic hexameter. The rhyme scheme of these lines is “ababbcbcc.” Whew! That’s quite a poetry puzzle! I dare you… LOL

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Resources:
http://examples.yourdictionary.com/stanza-examples.html
http://www.mrdaley.com/wordpress/poetry/stanza/

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Writing Prompt: Write what appeals to you with the examples above. Writing the AABA and the AAAB were the most fun for me!

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Okay, now do everything else on the pledge for today and don’t forget to comment on today’s blog post!

RhyPiBoMo Pledge

RhyPiBoMo Pledge

Please comment ONLY ONE TIME below for a chance to win today’s prize!
Prizes will be drawn by Random.com next Sunday for the previous week.
To be eligible for a prize you must be a registered participant and
comment after each days lessons.

 

 

Saturday Schmaterday…Who’s up for Some Poetry and Picture Books?

One week of poetry & rhyme down…4 to go!

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I am tired but energized if that makes any sense! As I think I mentioned in one of the blogs, I am a night owl, HOOooo writes at night and sleeps during the day. It’s just how my brain functions best and with 4 kids, it is the only quiet time in the house. It works pretty well with our weekly schedule but weekends are difficult. I’m hoping I will find a few minutes today to actually read some picture books and do some of the writing prompts as I’ve been too busy writing future lessons and posting the daily blog posts.  I’ve thoroughly enjoyed everyone’s comments and I wish I could reply to them all. Just know that I am reading every one of them and it warms my heart to hear that you are enjoying this as much as I am. I also appreciate the humor that makes me giggle. The poem with An – gee was priceless and I have read it several times…Even Helen Frost like that one!

 

Don’t forget the Rhyming Party tomorrow on Facebook at noon.(Central Time) We will play some silly games and only be able to comment in rhyme. It is hilarious good fun! If you want to join the RhyPiBoMo Facebook Group, please request to join several hours before the party because I won’t be able to add you immediately before the event.

RhyPiBoMo Rhyming Party

Don’t forget to enter The Golden Quill Poetry Contest

Click the tab above that says “Golden Quill Poetry Contest” to enter. That is where you go to send your poem. There is no registration for this contest, just copy and paste your poem in the contact form and send it to me. There are quite a few rules as we are learning about poetry with all its rules, I didn’t want you  to think I was being soft on you! I have received several poems already. Please make sure you follow ALL the directions, especially leaving your first and last name as well as a contact email address or phone number so i can contact you if you are one of the winners.  Any poem that does not follow all the rules will be disqualified. AND…you may only enter one poem. Maybe next year we will have multiple categories but I needed to keep it simple this year. Good luck and may Willy S. be looking over your shoulder!  For contest details: https://angiekarcher.wordpress.com/rhypibomo-golden-quill-poetry-contest/

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RhyPiBoMo Poetry Contest Scroll

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Today’s guest blogger mentions in her post that she is “a writer who rhymes. No claim to being a poet.” There are many of us that can completely relate to that! I’m thrilled that she is here, not to defend herself, but to share her wisdom about writing rhyme…her work speaks for itself and needs no defending whatsoever!

 

So, without further ado, I’m honored to present today’s

Golden Quill Guest Blogger

Denise Fleming

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         Rhypibomo Guest Blogger Badge      Denise Fleming 1

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Crunch, munch, caterpillars lunch…

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Growing up I chanted nursery rhymes. I listened to a lot of broadway show tunes, because my mom was active in local theatre and every now and then she would be in a musical. My sister and I would learn the lyrics and would sing along with Mom. My dad listened to jazz and the blues and we sang along to that. So my background is made up of song lyrics. Lots of near rhyme, single syllable rhyme and rhythm. I feel rhythm is a big part of a good picture book text. Picture books are theatre—are meant to be read aloud.

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When I started writing and illustrating picture books, I had only taken one workshop. A great 10 day workshop with Uri Schulevitz, Writing with Pictures, which introduced me to how to create a complete picture book. I remember him saying don’t write in rhyme, there is too much bad rhyme out there, and don’t use a lot of color because it will cancel itself out and end up being another form of B&W. Well, no worry, I hadn’t planned on writing BAD rhyme and color was my thing, so that surely didn’t apply to me. My first book was In The Tall, Tall Grass, written in rhyme, packed with color. It did exceptionally well. So I merrily went on rhyming and using lots of color.

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Then FB came along and all these blog posts were written and come to find out that I was doing BAD things like one syllable rhyme and near rhyme, and that I did not know a lot of the terms I was supposed to know. Good lord, I was setting a very bad example! Then Angie Karcher posted about RhyPiBoMo. And I signed up, because someone needed to defend me. I am a writer who rhymes. No claim to being a poet.

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Some of my books are rhyming. Others are not because they just wouldn’t work. Time To Sleep started as a rhyming text, but I had too much info to impart. I would have had to force rhyme. Instead, I used a refrain, “winter is on its way,” to tie the story together.

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In The Tall, Tall Grass is a rhyming chant. The reader is watching creatures all around going about their lives: “Crunch, munch caterpillars lunch / Dart, dip,hummingbirds sip.”

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Denise Fleming 3

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Barnyard Banter is rollicking verse. A goose is running around chasing a butterfly. Everybody is where they should be except goose: “Cows in the pasture, moo, moo, mom, moo / Roosters in the barnyard, cock a doodle doo.” Where Once There Was A Wood is about an area of land that has been leveled for a housing development: “Where once there was a wood, a meadow and a creek / Where once the red fox rested and closed his eyes to sleep.” All three books are written in simple rhyme, but each one has a particular rhythm to evoke a particular mood.

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Denise Fleming 2

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It is hard to explain BAD RHYME to people. For some reason people seem to think if you are going to write for children you must rhyme. NO. They also think that if you have sentences that rhyme and you string them together with no real intent or purpose that works. NO. Nonsense rhyme. NO (leave that to those who know what they are doing).
If you have a manuscript written in rhyme, look at it honestly. Drop the rhyme, write it in prose—Does it make sense? Is it clearer? Were you forcing the rhyme?

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My advice is to read a lot of poetry. There are some wonderful poets that write for children. Read collections. Get out those sticky notes and mark the poems you like. Analyze why you like those particular poets. Read adult poets. And when you read, read out loud. Read with expression. Enjoy yourself!

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Bio:
Denise Fleming is the award-winning author and illustrator of many well known children’s books including In the Tall, Tall Grass and In the Small, Small Pond, which received a Caldecott Honor and her most recent book Underground.
As a young girl, Denise used to spend hours in her father’s workshop cutting, gluing, carving and building things. Today, she spends many hours in her own workshop studio, cutting, gluing and creating her picture books. Denise’s unique papermaking technique Is a labor-intensive process that involves hauling buckets of water, mixing and dying cotton fiber pulp. She then pours pulp through hand-cut stencils to form her bold, textured Illustrations. Denise’s love of language is apparent in her writing which combines rhythm, rhyme and lots of verbs. Denise Fleming’s books get kids laughing and loving reading.
Denise is a graduate of Kendall College of Art and Design in Michigan. Along with her husband and daughter, Denise lives in Ohio. Her books are a family effort as together they review words, pictures and ideas for new books. For more information about Denise Fleming and her books, visit her online at http://www.denisefleming.com.

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UnderGround

Thank you Denise Fleming!

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RhyPiBoMo Daily Lesson: Saturday, April 5th
By Angie Karcher © 2014
Lesson 7

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There are 3 basic genres of poetry: Lyrical, Narrative and Dramatic

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Lyrical Voice

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Lyrical Voice is the voice of the poet coming through in the written poem.
(write this down)

 

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A lyrical poem expresses the emotions and feelings of a poet. It is used to express a personal how the poem views the world around him/her and of personal experiences. The poet puts him or herself in the poem. Lyrical voice is the most common voice used by poets.
This is where we get the word lyrics – the words of songs – this associates poetry with music. It is derived from a musical instrument called the lyre that was used to accompany the reading of this type of poem. The lyrical poem was set to music.
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A Lyre is a small, stringed, harp-like instrument played mostly in ancient Egypt, Israel and Greece.
This can most often be identified by the use of the words I, me, my, mine, we, our, ours, and us
Interestingly, poetry has changed over the years in many ways but one noticeable difference from original poetry is that today poetry is mostly read silently. Years ago, poetry was sung or read aloud in poetry readings or plays. It was a social experience enjoyed by many writers and non-writers of the day. Of course, poetry readings are held today but are not nearly the social gatherings as they once were.

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Sadly, a written poem can be compared to the written, musical score of a song. The joy is in hearing the notes played by instruments as there is joy in hearing the words said out loud. This allows for expressiveness, dramatic accents, pacing, and much more.
I had never thought about how our culture today is missing out on this art form of poetry…the oral sharing of a poem and the music of language.

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Narrative Voice

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Narrative Voice is the poet telling the story through the written word. (write this down)
The narrative voice tells a story. These stories may be humorous, sad, nonsensical, epic, or as simple as a nursery rhyme. The narrator is the storyteller. The story may be complete fantasy or it may be true but the poet never puts him or herself in the narrative poem.
A narrative poem typically uses a simple meter, such as a couplet (2 line stanza) or a quatrain. (4 line stanza)
They usually have a simple rhyme scheme…

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A narrative poem typically uses a light meter for a humorous poem and a more structured, rigid meter for a serious poem.
Sometimes they are written in free verse.

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Free verse poetry is written without rhyme and doesn’t follow any poetic form. (write this down)

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It is full of emotion that is expressed in alliteration, consonance, internal rhyme and/or repetition. There are really no rules but some poets create their own rules.

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An example:
This is one of my all-time favorite poems so I had to post it!

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Casey at the Bat by Ernest Lawrence

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The outlook wasn’t brilliant for the Mudville Nine that day;
The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play,
And then when Cooney died at first, and Barrows did the same,
A sickly silence fell upon the patrons of the game.

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A straggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest
Clung to that hope which springs eternal in the human breast;
They thought, if only Casey could get but a whack at that –
They’d put up even money, now, with Casey at the bat.

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But Flynn preceded Casey, as did also Jimmy Blake,
And the former was a pudding and the latter was a fake;
So upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat,
For there seemed but little chance of Casey’s getting to the bat.

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But Flynn let drive a single, to the wonderment of all,
And Blake, the much despised, tore the cover off the ball;
And when the dust had lifted, and the men saw what had occurred,
There was Jimmy safe at second and Flynn a-hugging third.

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Then from 5,000 throats and more there rose a lusty yell;
It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell;
It knocked upon the mountain and recoiled upon the flat,
For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat.

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There was ease in Casey’s manner as he stepped into his place;
There was pride in Casey’s bearing and a smile on Casey’s face.
And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,
No stranger in the crowd could doubt ’twas Casey at the bat.

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Ten thousand eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt;
Five thousand tongues applauded when he wiped them on his shirt.
Then while the writhing pitcher ground the ball into his hip,
Defiance gleamed in Casey’s eye, a sneer curled Casey’s lip.

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And now the leather-covered sphere came hurtling through the air,
And Casey stood a-watching it in haughty grandeur there.
Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped-
“That ain’t my style,” said Casey. “Strike one,” the umpire said.

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From the benches, black with people, there went up a muffled roar,
Like the beating of the storm-waves on a stern and distant shore.
“Kill him! Kill the umpire!” shouted someone on the stand;
And it’s likely they’d a-killed him had not Casey raised his hand.

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With a smile of Christian charity great Casey’s visage shone;
He stilled the rising tumult; he bade the game go on;
He signaled to the pitcher, and once more the spheroid flew;
But Casey still ignored it, and the umpire said, “Strike two.”

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“Fraud!” cried the maddened thousands, and echo answered fraud;
But one scornful look from Casey and the audience was awed.
They saw his face grow stern and cold, they saw his muscles strain,
And they knew that Casey wouldn’t let that ball go by again.

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The sneer is gone from Casey’s lip, his teeth are clenched in hate;
He pounds with cruel violence his bat upon the plate.
And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go,
And now the air is shattered by the force of Casey’s blow.

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Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright;
The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light,
And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout;
But there is no joy in Mudville — mighty Casey has struck out.

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Hey Diddle Diddle

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Hey diddle diddle,
The cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed,
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away with the spoon

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Old Mother Hubbard
http://www.rhymes.org.uk/old_mother_hubbard.htm

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Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll
http://www.jabberwocky.com/carroll/jabber/jabberwocky.html

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Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout Would Not Take the Garage Out by Shel Silverstein

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Jimmy Jet and his TV Set by Shel Silverstein
http://shelsilversteinpoems.wordpress.com/2012/01/22/jimmy-jet-and-his-tv-set/

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Dramatic Voice

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Dramatic Voice has several forms…Apostrophe, The Mask and Conversation

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Apostrophe is a dramatic voice where the poet talks to inanimate objects that cannot answer.

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Who has the better right
To smell the first summer rose,
Bee – you or I?

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For example:
O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman
http://www.famousliteraryworks.com/whitman_o_captain_my_captain.htm

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The Mask is when a poet pretends to be someone else and takes on their thoughts, their words, their life…This can be another person or an object.

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For example:
Message From a Caterpillar by Lilian Moore
Don’t shake this bough.
Don’t try to wake me now.
In this cocoon I’ve work to do.
Inside this silk I’m changing things.
I’m worm-like now but in this dark I’m growing wings.

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How to write a mask poem
http://ettcweb.lr.k12.nj.us/forms/mask.htm

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Conversation is when two different voices talk back and forth to each other.
Often conversation poems are written in a way that you have to guess who is talking.
A more recent name for this seems to be a dialogue poem.

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Sock and Shoe Speak
“Oh no!” said my sock,
“What a smell!
You need a bath, Mr. Shoe.
I can tell!”

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“I’m leather,” said Shoe.
“I don’t smell.
Your dryer sheet stinks!
I’m unwell!”

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“I need a clothespin,”
said the sock.
“It’s the only way
we will walk.”

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Shoe laughed and he smiled
“With no nose,
Sock, what will you do?
Hold your toes?”

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I tugged on my shoe
“They’re so tight!
Would you both please
stop with this fight!”

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For example:

There is a fourth genre of poetry called The Didactic form. A Didactic poem teaches a lesson or involves a moral dilemma. It is also considered instructional poetry meant to teach lessons on science, math, philosophy, etc.

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Examples of Didactic poems:
http://www.thehypertexts.com/Best%20Didactic%20Poems.htm

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Another Resource:
Poems for Kids
http://poemsforchildren.org/index.htm

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Writing Prompt: Choose a genre of poetry and write a poem that fits into the rules for that genre.

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Okay, now do everything else on the pledge for today and don’t forget to comment on today’s blog post!

RhyPiBoMo Pledge

RhyPiBoMo Pledge

Please comment ONLY ONE TIME below for a chance to win today’s prize!
Prizes will be drawn by Random.com next Sunday for the previous week.
To be eligible for a prize you must be a registered participant and
comment after each days lessons.